Elaine KamarckHow Change Happens–or Doesn’t: The Politics of US Public Policy

February 10, 2014

Elaine Kamarck is the author of How Change Happens–or Doesn’t: The Politics of US Public Policy (Lynne Rienner, 2013). Kamarck is a lecturer in public policy at the Harvard University Kennedy School after serving in the Clinton administration. She is also a senior fellow in the Governance Studies program at Brookings and the founding director [...]

Read the full article →

John Sides and Lynn VavreckThe Gamble: Choice and Chance in the 2012 Presidential Election

February 6, 2014

One of 2013’s most important new books in political science was The Gamble: Choice and Chance in the 2012 Presidential Election (Princeton UP 2013). I had the chance to interview one of the co-authors, John Sides (Associate Professor of Political Science at George Washington University), for the podcast about the early web-exclusive release of several early chapter. [...]

Read the full article →

Ravi K. PerryBlack Mayors, White Majorities: The Balancing Act of Racial Politics

February 3, 2014

Do black mayors face a different governing challenge than other mayors? Ravi K. Perry explores this question in his Black Mayors, White Majorities: The Balancing Act of Racial Politics (University of Nebraska Press, 2014). Perry is assistant professor of political science at Mississippi State University. Using the cities of Toledo and Dayton, Ohio as his [...]

Read the full article →

Kristin A. GossThe Paradox of Gender Equality: How American Women’s Groups Gained and Lost Their Public Voice

January 27, 2014

Kristin A. Goss is author of The Paradox of Gender Equality: How American Women’s Groups Gained and Lost Their Public Voice (University of Michigan Press 2013). She is associate professor of public policy and political science at Duke University. Goss challenges the conventional wisdom about women’s group with new congressional hearing data. Rather than ebbing-and-flowing [...]

Read the full article →

Joshua MitchellTocqueville in Arabia: Dilemmas in a Democratic Age

January 20, 2014

Joshua Mitchell is the author of Tocqueville in Arabia: Dilemmas in a Democratic Age (University of Chicago Press 2013). Mitchell is professor of political science in the Department of Government at Georgetown University. He has written several previous books including: The Fragility of Freedom: Tocqueville on Religion, Democracy, and the American Future (University of Chicago [...]

Read the full article →

Christina GreerBlack Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream

January 13, 2014

Christina Greer is the author of Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream (Oxford University Press, 2013). Greer is assistant professor of political science at Fordham University. In previous podcasts, authors have illuminated the immigrant experience of Latino and Asian Americans (Rouse, Masuoka and Junn), as well as the African American [...]

Read the full article →

Natalie Masuoka and Jane JunnThe Politics of Belonging: Race, Public Opinion, and Immigration

January 6, 2014

On the podcast over the last few months, we’ve heard from Phil Krestedemas, Ron Schmidt, Shannon Gleeson about various aspects of immigration and immigrants in the US. Adding to this impressive list is Natalie Masuoka and Jane Junn are authors of The Politics of Belonging: Race, Public Opinion, and Immigration (University of Chicago Press, 2013). Masuoka [...]

Read the full article →

Yuval LevinThe Great Debate: Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, and the Birth of Right and Left

January 4, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in History] If you went to college in the United States and took a Western Civ class, you’ve probably read at least a bit of Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790) and Thomas Paine’s Rights of Man (1791). The two are so often paired in history and political science classes that they are sometimes [...]

Read the full article →

Michael HuemerThe Problem of Political Authority: An Examination of the Right to Coerce and the Duty to Obey

January 1, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Philosophy] The philosopher Robert Nozick once claimed that the most basic question of Political Philosophy is “Why not Anarchy?”  Political philosophers pose this question often with the intent of demonstrating that there is indeed a good philosophical reason why governments should exist.  Indeed, we often simply take for granted that [...]

Read the full article →

Jeffrey ChurchInfinite Autonomy: The Divided Individual in the Political Thought of G.W.F. Hegel and Friedrich Nietzsche

December 30, 2013

Jeffrey Church is the author of Infinite Autonomy: The Divided Individual in the Political Thought of G.W.F. Hegel and Friedrich Nietzsche (Penn State Press 2012). The book won the Best First Book Award from the Political Theory Section of the American Political Science Association in 2013. Church is associate professor of political science at the [...]

Read the full article →