Loraine KennedyThe Politics of Economic Restructuring in India: Economic Governance and State Spatial Rescaling

November 26, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in South Asian Studies] Loraine Kennedy‘s The Politics of Economic Restructuring in India: Economic Governance and State Spatial Rescaling (Routledge, 2014) is a timely and important intervention into the debate on how economic liberalisation is transforming the Indian state. The book’s central argument is that these reforms have ‘rescaled’ the Indian state, with important consequences [...]

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Roundup on U.S. Immigration

November 24, 2014

With immigration in the news, it is worth revisiting some of the best New Books in Political Science podcasts on the subject for 2014. At the start of the summer, Benjamin Marquez brought to the podcast Democratizing Texas Politics: Race, Identity, and Mexican American Empowerment, 1945-2002 (University of Texas Press 2014). Democratizing Texas Politics covers [...]

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Candis Watts SmithBlack Mosaic: The Politics of Black Pan-Ethnic Diversity

November 18, 2014

Candis Watts Smith is the author of Black Mosaic: The Politics of Black Pan-Ethnic Diversity (NYU Press, 2014). Watts Smith is assistant professor of political science at Williams College. How do Black immigrants in the US view their racial and ethnic identities? Do they identify with being Black, African American, or something else? Like Christina [...]

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Dan SlaterOrdering Power: Contentious Politics and Authoritarian Leviathans in Southeast Asia

November 14, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Southeast Asian Studies] Few books on Southeast Asia cover as much geographic, historical and theoretical ground as Dan Slater’s Ordering Power: Contentious Politics and Authoritarian Leviathans in Southeast Asia (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Working across seven case studies, the book argues that existing theories of institutionalization don’t account for regional variation in regime type. [...]

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Mike O’ConnorA Commercial Republic: America’s Enduring Debate over Democratic Capitalism

November 10, 2014

Mike O’Connor is the author of A Commercial Republic: America’s Enduring Debate over Democratic Capitalism (University Press of Kansas 2014). He has also published articles in Contemporary Pragmatism and The Sixties. O’Connor teaches at Georgia State University in Atlanta, and holds a Ph.D. in American studies from the University of Texas at Austin. He was [...]

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Alon PeledTraversing Digital Babel: Information, E-Government, and Exchange

November 7, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Technology] Failure by government agencies to share information has had disastrous results globally. From the inability to prevent terrorist attacks, like the 9-11 attacks in New York City, Washington D.C., and Pennsylvania, to the ill-equipped and ill-fated responses to disasters like the nuclear meltdown at Fukushima, and Hurricane Katrina, a common denominator [...]

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Brian ArbourCandidate-Centered Campaigns: Political Messages, Winning Personalities, and Personal Appeals

November 3, 2014

As campaign season ends, what can we make of all those ads? Brian Arbour is the author of Candidate-Centered Campaigns: Political Messages, Winning Personalities, and Personal Appeals (Palgrave-MacMillan 2014). Arbour is assistant professor of political science at John Jay College, City University of New York. Why do certain candidates focus on making campaign promises and [...]

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Kirk Randazzo and Richard WatermanChecking the Courts: Law, Ideology, and Contingent Discretion

October 27, 2014

Kirk Randazzo is the author (with Richard Waterman) of Checking the Courts: Law, Ideology, and Contingent Discretion (SUNY Press 2014). Randazzo is associate professor of political science at the University of South Carolina. He has previously written several books on the courts and foreign policy. How does legislative language affect the courts? Randazzo and Waterman [...]

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Darrell M. WestBillionaires: Reflection on the Upper Crust

October 20, 2014

So how many billionaires are there in the world? And what do they have to do with politics? Darrell  M. West has answered those questions in Billionaires: Reflection on the Upper Crust (Brookings 2014). West is vice president of Governance Studies and director of the Center for Technology Innovation at the Brookings Institution. As an [...]

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Matthew HuberLifeblood: Oil, Freedom, and the Forces of Capital

October 17, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Geography]  Lifeblood: Oil, Freedom, and the Forces of Capital (University of Minnesota Press, 2013) is an incisive look into how oil permeates our lives and helped shape American politics during the twentieth century. Author Matthew Huber shows the crucial role oil and housing policy played in the New Deal and how, in subsequent decades, government [...]

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