Thomas Weiss and Dan Plesch, eds.We are Strong: Wartime Origins and the Future United Nations

March 5, 2015

Thomas Weiss and Dan Plesch are the co-editors of We Are Strong: Wartime Origins and the Future United Nations (Routledge, 2015). Weiss is Presidential Professor of Political Science and Director Emeritus of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at The City University of New York’s Graduate Center; Plesch is Director of the Centre for […]

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David BullockCoal Wars: Unions, Strikes, and Violence in Depression-Era Central Washington

February 23, 2015

David Bullock is the author of Coal Wars: Unions, Strikes, and Violence in Depression-Era Central Washington (Washington State University Press, 2014). Bullock is professor and is the chair of the Communications and Languages Department at Walla Walla University. Coal Wars is at once a political history, a regional history, and a labor organizing history. Through […]

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Deana A. RohlingerAbortion Politics, Mass Media, and Social Movements in America

February 16, 2015

Deana A. Rohlinger has just written Abortion Politics, Mass Media, and Social Movements in America (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Rohlinger is associate professor of sociology at Florida State University. In the last several weeks, the podcast has featured a variety of political scientists who study interest groups and social movements. This week, Deana Rohlinger brings […]

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Daniel DiSalvoGovernment against Itself: Public Union Power and Its Consequences

February 9, 2015

Daniel DiSalvo is the author of Government against Itself: Public Union Power and Its Consequences (Oxford University Press, 2015). DiSalvo is associate professor of political science at the City College of New York, CUNY, and a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute. It is rare that an academic book attracts attention and stokes real controversy, […]

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Nausheen H. AnwarInfrastructure Redux: Crisis, Progress in Industrial Pakistan and Beyond

February 4, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in South Asian Studies]  In Infrastructure Redux: Crisis, Progress in Industrial Pakistan and Beyond (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), Nausheen H. Anwar explores double-edged narratives of development. Through detailed case studies of Sialkot and Faisalabad, as well as analyses of development in Pakistan since independence and the impact of liberalized trade policies on industrial labour, the book explores how ideas […]

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Donald P. Haider-Markel and Jami K. TaylorTransgender Rights and Politics: Groups, Issue Framing, and Policy Adoption

February 2, 2015

Donald P. Haider-Markel and Jami K. Taylor are the editors of Transgender Rights and Politics: Groups, Issue Framing, & Policy Adoption (University of Michigan UP, 2014). Haider-Markel is professor of political science and chair at the University of Kansas, Taylor is associate professor of political science and public administration at the University of Toledo. Last […]

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Carol GouldInteractive Democracy: The Social Roots of Global Justice

February 2, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Philosophy] Contemporary advances in technology have in many ways made the world smaller.  It is now possible for vast numbers of geographically disparate people to interact, communicate, coordinate, and plan.  These advances potentially bring considerable benefits to democracy, such as greater participation, more inclusion, easier dissemination of information, and so on.  […]

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Thomas F. SchallerThe Stronghold: How Republicans Captured Congress but Surrendered the White House

January 29, 2015

Thomas F. Schaller is the author of The Stronghold: How Republicans Captured Congress but Surrendered the White House (Yale University Press, 2015). Schaller is professor of political science at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. With a new Congress up and running, Republican control of Capitol Hill is back. But has the Republican Party sacrificed […]

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Keith WailooPain: A Political History

January 20, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Medicine] Is pain real? Is pain relief a right? Who decides? In Pain: A Political History (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014), Keith Wailoo investigates how people have interpreted and judged the suffering of others in the US from the mid-1940s to the present. While doctors and patients figure in his story, the primary protagonists are politicians, […]

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Frank R. Baumgartner and Bryan D. JonesThe Politics of Information: Problem Definition and the Course of Public Policy in America

January 19, 2015

Frank R. Baumgartner and Bryan D. Jones are the authors of The Politics of Information: Problem Definition and the Course of Public Policy in America (University of Chicago Press 2014). Baumgartner is the Richard J. Richardson Distinguished Professor of Political Science at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill and Jones is […]

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