Shaazka BeyerleCurtailing Corruption: People Power for Accountability and Justice

September 15, 2014

Shaazka Beyerle is the author of the new book, Curtailing Corruption: People Power for Accountability and Justice (Lynne Rienner 2014). Beyerle is senior adviser at the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict and a visiting scholar at the Center for Transatlantic Relations, Johns Hopkins University. Beyerle brings a scholar’s approach and a practitioner’s eye for detail [...]

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Julia AzariDelivering the People’s Message: The Changing Politics of the Presidential Mandate

September 8, 2014

Julia Azari has written Delivering the People’s Message: The Changing Politics of the Presidential Mandate (Cornell University Press, 2014). Azari is assistant professor of political science at Marquette University. What was President Obama’s mandate when he was elected in 2008? Did that mandate extend to 2012? We commonly think that mandates attach to wide electoral [...]

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Staci ZavattaroCities for Sale: Municipalities as Public Relations and Marketing Firms

September 1, 2014

Staci Zavattaro is the author of the new book Cities for Sale: Municipalities as Public Relations and Marketing Firms (SUNY Press, 2013). Zavattaro is assistant professor of public administration at Mississippi State University. Cities have received renewed interest from political scientists recently. Previously, Ravi K. Perry was on the podcast to discuss his book Black [...]

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Matt Grossmann Artists of the Possible: Governing Networks and American Policy Change Since 1945

August 25, 2014

Matt Grossmann is back on the podcast with his newest book, Artists of the Possible: Governing Networks and American Policy Change Since 1945 (Oxford University Press, 2014). Grossmann is associate professor of political science at Michigan State University. He is also author of The Not-So-Special Interests, for which he appeared on the podcast in 2012. [...]

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Glenn FeldmanNation within a Nation: The American South and the Federal Government

August 18, 2014

Glenn Feldman is the editor of Nation within a Nation: The American South and the Federal Government (University Press of Florida, 2014). Feldman is professor of history at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. He is the author or editor of numerous books, including Painting Dixie Red: When, Where, Why, and How the South Became Republican [...]

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Randall L. SchwellerMaxwell’s Demon and the Golden Apple: Global Discord in the New Millennium

August 11, 2014

Randall L. Schweller is Professor of Political Science and a Social and Behavioral Sciences Joan N. Huber Faculty Fellow at Ohio State University.  He has written Maxwell’s Demon and the Golden Apple: Global Discord in the New Millennium (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014) In Maxwell’s Demon, Schweller examines the future of world politics, by connecting the [...]

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Matthew HedstromThe Rise of Liberal Religion: Book Culture and American Spirituality in the Twentieth Century

August 8, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Religion] Expressions of religious belief through popular media are a regular occurrence in our contemporary age. But the circulation and negotiation of religious identities in public contexts has a fairly long history in American culture. Matthew Hedstrom, Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia, looks beyond the church to determine how [...]

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John L. Campbell and Ove K. PedersenThe National Origins of Policy Ideas: Knowledge Regimes in the United States, France, Germany, and Denmark

August 4, 2014

John L. Campbell and Ove K. Pedersen are the authors of The National Origins of Policy Ideas: Knowledge Regimes in the United States, France, Germany, and Denmark (Princeton University Press, 2014). Campbell is the Class of 1925 Professor of Sociology at Dartmouth College and professor of political economy and the Copenhagen Business School. Pederson is [...]

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William E. ConnollyThe Fragility of Things: Self-Organizing Processes, Neoliberal Fantasies, and Democratic Activism

July 30, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Science, Technology, and Society] Bill Connolly‘s new book proposes a way to think about the world as a gathering of self-organizing systems or ecologies, and from there explores the ramifications and possibilities of this notion for how we think about and practice work with markets, politics, daily life, and beyond. The Fragility of [...]

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Josh LernerMaking Democracy Fun: How Game Design Can Empower Citizens and Transform Politics

July 28, 2014

Josh Lerner is the author of Making Democracy Fun: How Game Design Can Empower Citizens and Transform Politics (MIT Press, 2014). Lerner earned his Ph.D. in Political Science from The New School for Social Research, and is now the Executive Director of The Participatory Budgeting Project, a nonprofit organization that empowers communities to decide how [...]

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