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Shana Kushner Gadarian and Bethany Albertson are the authors of Anxious Politics: Democratic Citizenship in a Threatening World (Cambridge UP, 2015). Gadarian is assistant professor of political science at Syracuse University; Albertson is assistant professor of government at the University of Texas, Austin.

Anxious Politics explores the emotional side of politics. Albertson and Gadarian argue that political anxiety triggers politics engagement in ways that are potentially both promising and harmful for democracy. Using public health, immigration, terrorism, and climate change, the book demonstrates that anxiety affects how we consume political news, who we trust, and what politics we support. Anxiety about politics triggers coping strategies in the political world, where these strategies are often shaped by partisan agendas.

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Adam SheingateBuilding a Business of Politics: The Rise of Political Consulting and the Transformation of American Democracy

February 2, 2016

Adam Sheingate has written Building a Business of Politics: The Rise of Political Consulting and the Transformation of American Democracy (Oxford University Press, 2016). Sheingate is associate professor of political science at Johns Hopkins University. Who is spending all this money – multiple billions in 2016 – on politics? Consultants, of course, and they've been […]

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Paul R. JosephsonFish Sticks, Sports Bras, and Aluminum Cans: The Politics of Everyday Technologies

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Michael SchwalbeRigging The Game: How Inequality is Reproduced in Everyday Life (2nd Edition)

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Rogers M. SmithPolitical Peoplehood: The Roles of Values, Interests, and Identities

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Christopher FaricyWelfare for the Wealthy: Parties, Social Spending, and Inequality in the United States

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Luke Nichter and Douglas BrinkleyThe Nixon Tapes: 1973

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Howard Brick and Christopher PhelpsRadicals in America: The U.S. Left since the Second World War

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Anthony ManiscalcoPublic Spaces, Marketplaces, and the Constitution: Shopping Malls and the First Amendment

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Anthony Maniscalco is the author of Public Spaces, Marketplaces, and the Constitution: Shopping Malls and the First Amendment (SUNY Press, 2015). Maniscalco is the director of the Edward T. Rogowsky Internship Program in Government and Public Affairs at the City University of New York. What can you say in a shopping mall? Maniscalco finds not […]

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