Glenn FeldmanNation within a Nation: The American South and the Federal Government

University Press of Florida, 2014

by Heath Brown on August 18, 2014

Glenn Feldman

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Glenn Feldman is the editor of Nation within a Nation: The American South and the Federal Government (University Press of Florida, 2014). Feldman is professor of history at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. He is the author or editor of numerous books, including Painting Dixie Red: When, Where, Why, and How the South Became Republican and Before Brown: Civil Rights and White Backlash in the Modern South. Some of political scientists included in the volume are: Thomas Schaller, Allan McBride, and Natalie Motise Davis.

In the introduction, Feldman writes “No other region has been more important than the South in determining the course of U.S. politics and history. This was so in 1776, and 1865, and is still true today, although in vastly different ways.” Nation within a Nation sets out to explore this history. The book is an interesting read for those concerned with the history of the South, but also for those interested in how newer issues such as the US-Mexican border and criminal justice policies fit within the region’s history. The chapters by Allan McBride and Natalie Motise Davis, in particular, provide new information on the relationship between the South and the Tea Party.

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