Staci Zavattaro

View on Amazon

Staci Zavattaro is the author of the new book Cities for Sale: Municipalities as Public Relations and Marketing Firms (SUNY Press, 2013). Zavattaro is assistant professor of public administration at Mississippi State University.

Cities have received renewed interest from political scientists recently. Previously, Ravi K. Perry was on the podcast to discuss his book Black Mayors, White Majorities: The Balancing Act of Racial Politics (University of Nebraska Press, 2014). Zavattaro approaches the local subject from the perspective of public administration and an eye toward the marketing of cities. You’d be hard presses to live in a community that hasn’t launched a new publicity campaign or a new slogan to attract new residents.  Zavattaro tries to analyze these efforts and suggests that cities use six selling tactics to advance their interests: branding, media relations, in-house publications, use of volunteers and outside organizations as PR surrogates, aesthetic and affective appeal, and built environment via sustainability. Zavattaro acknowledges the limits of this metaphor and, in her conclusion, addresses the risks associated with a model of urban governance focused on marketing rather than other social values.

{ 0 comments }

Matt Grossmann Artists of the Possible: Governing Networks and American Policy Change Since 1945

August 25, 2014

Matt Grossmann is back on the podcast with his newest book, Artists of the Possible: Governing Networks and American Policy Change Since 1945 (Oxford University Press, 2014). Grossmann is associate professor of political science at Michigan State University. He is also author of The Not-So-Special Interests, for which he appeared on the podcast in 2012. [...]

Read the full article →

Glenn FeldmanNation within a Nation: The American South and the Federal Government

August 18, 2014

Glenn Feldman is the editor of Nation within a Nation: The American South and the Federal Government (University Press of Florida, 2014). Feldman is professor of history at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. He is the author or editor of numerous books, including Painting Dixie Red: When, Where, Why, and How the South Became Republican [...]

Read the full article →

Randall L. SchwellerMaxwell’s Demon and the Golden Apple: Global Discord in the New Millennium

August 11, 2014

Randall L. Schweller is Professor of Political Science and a Social and Behavioral Sciences Joan N. Huber Faculty Fellow at Ohio State University.  He has written Maxwell’s Demon and the Golden Apple: Global Discord in the New Millennium (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014) In Maxwell’s Demon, Schweller examines the future of world politics, by connecting the [...]

Read the full article →

Matthew HedstromThe Rise of Liberal Religion: Book Culture and American Spirituality in the Twentieth Century

August 8, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Religion] Expressions of religious belief through popular media are a regular occurrence in our contemporary age. But the circulation and negotiation of religious identities in public contexts has a fairly long history in American culture. Matthew Hedstrom, Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia, looks beyond the church to determine how [...]

Read the full article →

John L. Campbell and Ove K. PedersenThe National Origins of Policy Ideas: Knowledge Regimes in the United States, France, Germany, and Denmark

August 4, 2014

John L. Campbell and Ove K. Pedersen are the authors of The National Origins of Policy Ideas: Knowledge Regimes in the United States, France, Germany, and Denmark (Princeton University Press, 2014). Campbell is the Class of 1925 Professor of Sociology at Dartmouth College and professor of political economy and the Copenhagen Business School. Pederson is [...]

Read the full article →

William E. ConnollyThe Fragility of Things: Self-Organizing Processes, Neoliberal Fantasies, and Democratic Activism

July 30, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Science, Technology, and Society] Bill Connolly‘s new book proposes a way to think about the world as a gathering of self-organizing systems or ecologies, and from there explores the ramifications and possibilities of this notion for how we think about and practice work with markets, politics, daily life, and beyond. The Fragility of [...]

Read the full article →

Josh LernerMaking Democracy Fun: How Game Design Can Empower Citizens and Transform Politics

July 28, 2014

Josh Lerner is the author of Making Democracy Fun: How Game Design Can Empower Citizens and Transform Politics (MIT Press, 2014). Lerner earned his Ph.D. in Political Science from The New School for Social Research, and is now the Executive Director of The Participatory Budgeting Project, a nonprofit organization that empowers communities to decide how [...]

Read the full article →

Judith KelleyMonitoring Democracy: When International Election Observation Works, and Why It Often Fails

July 21, 2014

Judith Kelley is the author of Monitoring Democracy: When International Election Observation Works, and Why It Often Fails (Princeton University  Press, 2012). Kelley is associate professor of public policy and political science at Duke University. Monitoring Democracy, which won the Co-Winner of the 2013 Chadwick F. Alger Prize from the International Studies Association, has numerous [...]

Read the full article →

Darren HalpinThe Organization of Political Interest Groups: Designing Advocacy

July 14, 2014

Darren Halpin is the author of The Organization of Political Interest Groups: Designing Advocacy (Routledge 2014). Halpin is associate professor and reader in Policy Studies, and the Head of School of Sociology, at the Research School of Social Sciences, the Australian National University. He is also co-editor of the journal Interest Groups and Advocacy and [...]

Read the full article →