Josh Lerner

View on Amazon

Josh Lerner is the author of Making Democracy Fun: How Game Design Can Empower Citizens and Transform Politics (MIT Press, 2014). Lerner earned his Ph.D. in Political Science from The New School for Social Research, and is now the Executive Director of The Participatory Budgeting Project, a nonprofit organization that empowers communities to decide how to spend public money.

Lerner asks the question at the start of the book: Can games make democratic participation more fun? He does not mean game theory, he means actual games. Designed activities aimed to infuse the rules of a game to political decision making. He traces the use of gaming to advance public participation through Latin America, with particular attention on Rosario, Argentina.

{ 0 comments }

Judith KelleyMonitoring Democracy: When International Election Observation Works, and Why It Often Fails

July 21, 2014

Judith Kelley is the author of Monitoring Democracy: When International Election Observation Works, and Why It Often Fails (Princeton University  Press, 2012). Kelley is associate professor of public policy and political science at Duke University. Monitoring Democracy, which won the Co-Winner of the 2013 Chadwick F. Alger Prize from the International Studies Association, has numerous [...]

Read the full article →

Darren HalpinThe Organization of Political Interest Groups: Designing Advocacy

July 14, 2014

Darren Halpin is the author of The Organization of Political Interest Groups: Designing Advocacy (Routledge 2014). Halpin is associate professor and reader in Policy Studies, and the Head of School of Sociology, at the Research School of Social Sciences, the Australian National University. He is also co-editor of the journal Interest Groups and Advocacy and [...]

Read the full article →

Suzanne MettlerDegrees of Inequality: How the Politics of Higher Education Sabotaged the American Dream

July 9, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Big Ideas] From 1945 to the mid-1970s, the rate at which Americans went to and graduate from college rose steadily. Then, however, the rate of college going and completion stagnated. In 1980, a quarter of adult Americans had college degrees; today the figure is roughly the same. What happened? In her book Degrees [...]

Read the full article →

Donovan ChauExploiting Africa: The Influence of Maoist China in Algeria, Ghana, and Tanzania

July 7, 2014

Donovan Chau is the author of Exploiting Africa: The Influence of Maoist China in Algeria, Ghana, and Tanzania (Naval Institute Press, 2014). Chau is an associate professor of political science at California State University. Chau examines China’s role in Algeria, Ghana, and Tanzania from the 1950s to the 1970s. China used its limited diplomatic, intelligence, [...]

Read the full article →

Ian Haney LopezDog Whistle Politics: How Coded Racial Appeals Have Reinvented Racism and Wrecked the Middle Class

June 30, 2014

Ian Haney Lopez is the author of Dog Whistle Politics: How Coded Racial Appeals Have Reinvented Racism & Wrecked the Middle Class (Oxford UP 2014). He is the John H. Boalt Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley, and on the Executive Committee of the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice. Lopez [...]

Read the full article →

Benjamin MarquezDemocratizing Texas Politics: Race, Identity, and Mexican American Empowerment, 1945-2002

June 23, 2014

Benjamin Marquez is the author of Democratizing Texas Politics: Race, Identity, and Mexican American Empowerment, 1945-2002 (University of Texas Press 2014). Marquez is professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Democratizing Texas Politics covers 50 years of Texas political history, but also the changing institutional power of parties, organizations, and groups [...]

Read the full article →

Olivier ZunzPhilanthropy in America: A History

June 16, 2014

Olivier Zunz is the author of Philanthropy in America: A History (Princeton University Press 2014). The paperback addition of the book has recently been published with a new preface from the author. Zunz is Commonwealth Professor of History at the University of Virginia. The book tracks the origins of philanthropy in America as a pact [...]

Read the full article →

Sener AkturkRegimes and Ethnicity and Nationhood in Germany, Russia, and Turkey

June 11, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies] What processes must take place in order for countries to radically redefine who is a citizen? Why was Russia able to finally remove ethnicity from internal passports after failing to do so during seven decades of Soviet rule? What led German leaders to finally grant guest workers from [...]

Read the full article →

Emery RoeMaking the Most of Mess: Reliability and Policy in Today’s Management Challenges

June 9, 2014

Emery Roe is the author of Making the Most of Mess: Reliability and Policy in Today’s Management Challenges (Duke UP 2014). Roe is senior associate with the Center for Catastrophic Risk Management at the University of California, Berkeley. Roe’s book navigates between economics, ecology, and public policy. He challenges the notion that all messes are [...]

Read the full article →